Monday, 05 December 2016

Verb to be - ESL EFL Activities, Games and Worksheets

It must be true

ESL EFL Matching and Speaking Activity - Beginner - 30 Minutes

Here is an enjoyable card game for beginners to help them practice sentence formation using the verb to be. This activity helps students understand subject-verb agreement and how to use the 'verb to be' to make true statements. The class is divided into groups of three and each group is given a set of cards. The cards contain a mixture of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and the verb to be. Each player is given 15 cards. The rest of the cards are placed face down in a pile. The first player makes a true positive or negative sentence using three of his or her word cards, e.g. I’m a student. If the sentence is correctly formed and makes a true sentence, the player wins a point. Players may indicate to things or people in the classroom to help justify their sentence. The player then takes three more cards from the pile. Then the next student makes a true sentence and so on. If any player cannot put a sentence down, they take a card from the pile and put one of their cards back, missing a turn. Students continue until all the cards have been used. The player with the highest number of points at the end of the game is the winner.

It must be true.PDF  Free 

 

Aiko and Richard

ESL EFL Writing and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 25 Minutes

In this pairwork activity, students use the verb to be and questions to find out about personal information. The class is split into two groups (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding worksheet. The students look at the empty profile on their worksheet and work together with the people in their group to create questions for the missing information using the verb to be. Group A writes questions about a man and Group B writes questions about a woman. After the questions have been checked, the students pair up with someone from the other group. They take it in turns to ask and answer questions using the third person and complete the profile information. Alternatively, students could take on the role of the two people and ask and answer questions in the first person.

Aiko and Richard.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Memory Game

ESL EFL Writing, Listening and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 25 Minutes

Here is a fun memory game that helps students practice the past simple of the verb to be. The students are divided into pairs (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding worksheet. Each worksheet is placed face down in front of the student. The students then play a memory game where they have to remember pictures of different things. The students have 15 seconds to remember as many pictures as they can on their worksheet. They then turn their paper back over and write about the pictures using ‘There was/were...’, e.g. There was a bottle. When they have finished writing, the students swap their face down worksheets and look at the pictures on their partner’s paper. The students then look at their sentences and take it in turns to ask about the pictures, e.g. Was there a...? / Were there any...? Their partner answers ‘Yes, there was/were’ or ‘No, there wasn’t/weren’t’. Students score one point for each remembered item. The student with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Memory Game.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Park Street

ESL EFL Writing, Listening and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 25 Minutes

In this compelling group activity, students practice giving information using the verb to be in affirmative sentences. The class is divided into groups of 8 to 14. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet and a house card. The students imagine that they are the person on their card. They write in their details next to the house where they live. The object of the game is to find out who lives in the other houses on Park Street and to write all the details on their worksheet. To do this, they talk to the other students in their group, exchanging information using the verb to be. At first the students are only able to give their own information, e.g. I’m Chloe. I’m at house number 1 with Leo. I’m 32 years old, etc. However, when they know more, they can pass on information about anyone in the street, e.g. Alex is at house number 2. He is 30 years old. He is single, etc. When everyone has finished, the answers are checked as a class.

Park Street.PDF  Free 

 

Questions and Answers

ESL EFL Reading, Writing and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 30 Minutes

In this imaginative group activity, students practice writing and responding to yes/no questions with the verb to be. Students then play a guessing game using the questions and answers. The students are divided into groups of six and each group is given a set of question slips. Each student takes one slip and thinks of a personal information question that uses the verb to be, e.g. a question about age, family, marital status, a feeling, appearance, a favourite, a talent, etc. The students write down the next word in the question on the slip. When they have written the word, they pass the slip to the person on their right, who writes the next word and passes it on. The slip goes from student to student until the question is complete. The student who writes the last word adds a question mark and hands the completed question to the next person. That person writes an answer underneath, puts it in an envelope and takes another slip. Students continue this process until all the question slips are completed. Students then take it in turns to take a slip from the envelope, read it aloud and guess who answered the question. If they guess correctly, they win a point. The student with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.

Questions and Answers.PDF  Exclusive 

Secret Identity

ESL EFL Writing and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 30 Minutes

Here is a fun activity to help students practice yes/no questions and short answers using the verb to be. In the activity, students play a game where they have to guess the name of a famous person or character by asking and answering 20 yes/no questions with the verb to be. Each student is given a worksheet. The first ten questions on their worksheet have been done for them. Students begin by completing questions 11 to 20. When they have finished writing, the students are divided into pairs. Each student imagines they are a famous person or character. They can be a real person or a famous character from a book, movie, cartoon, etc. Students then begin the game. They take it in turns to guess who their partner is by asking yes/no questions with the verb to be. Their partner answers 'Yes, I am' or 'No, I'm not' accordingly. When everyone has finished, the students swap partners. This time they ask questions about each other’s previous partner to practice the third person singular. As an extension, students can play the game as a class, or they could be famous couples and play the game using the plural forms of the verb to be.

Secret Identity.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Snap It Up

ESL EFL Matching Activity - Elementary - 25 Minutes

In this engaging card game, students play a game of snap by matching questions with short answers using the verb to be. The students are divided into pairs. One student is given a set of question cards and the other is given a set of short answer cards. Both students turn over a card from their pile at the same time and place them on the table next to each other. If the answer matches the question, the first student to say ‘Snap’ wins a point. Students then pick up their own cards, shuffle their pack, and play again. If the answer doesn’t match the question, the students continue turning over cards from their piles until someone says ‘Snap’. The first student to get 15 points wins the game.

Snap It Up.PDF  Free 

 

Things we have in common

ESL EFL Writing, Matching and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 30 Minutes

In this entertaining activity, students write positive and negative sentences about things that they have in common with other students using the verb to be. This is followed by a matching game. The students are divided into groups of four or five and each student is given a card. The students write their name at the top of the card. Students then pair up with another student in their group and write two sentences about something they have in common, beginning with ‘We're’ and ‘We aren’t’. When they have finished, they pair up with a different group member and write down something else they have in common, and so on, until the card is complete. When they have finished they cut out their name and sentences into small cards. They combine their cards with the other students in their group, and then spread them out face down on the table in two sets. The students then take it in turns to turn over two name cards and one sentence card. If the sentence is true for the two students whose names have been turned up, the student keeps the sentence. If the sentence is not true, the student turns all the cards back over. The students continue in this way until there are no sentence cards left. The student with the most cards at the end of the game is the winner.

Things we have in common.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Where are you from?

ESL EFL Listening, Speaking and Writing Activity - Elementary - 35 Minutes

In this fun memory game, student use the ‘verb to be’ to talk about where they and other people are from. This activity can also be used to teach or practice countries, nationalities and capital cities. Each student is given an identity card. The students imagine that they are from the city and country on their card. Their task is to tell other students the city they are from and their nationality using the verb to be. The students then go around the class telling each other where they are from, e.g. I’m from Canberra. I’m Australian. The students must listen carefully and try to remember where each person is from. When they have spoken to everyone, the students are divided into pairs and each pair is given a copy of the worksheet. Working together with their partner, the students try to remember and write down where each person is from using the verb to be, e.g. Joshua is from Canberra. He is Australian. When everyone has finished writing, the answers are checked with the class. Pairs win one point for every factually correct sentence and an extra point for the correct use of the verb to be. The pair with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.

Where are you from.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Related Teaching Activities: Present Simple  /  Present Simple Questions

Comments  

#1 Orlando Sánchez 2016-12-01 00:53
Amazing material.
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