Indirect Questions - ESL Worksheets, Role-Plays and Activities

Ask Politely

ESL Indirect Questions Worksheet - Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 20 minutes

This useful worksheet activity can be used to help students learn and practice how to form indirect questions. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. The students begin by changing direct questions on the worksheet into indirect questions. When the students have finished, the answers are checked with the class. Students then use the information in the first exercise to answer questions about how indirect questions are formed. Afterwards, the students go through the answers and review the grammar rules associated with indirect questions. Students then practice the structure of indirect questions by putting words in the right order. Finally, the students create their own indirect questions. The students then practice asking and answering the questions with their classmates.
 

Indirect Questions

ESL Indirect Questions Worksheet - Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 25 minutes

This enjoyable worksheet activity is ideal for teaching students how to make indirect questions. The students begin by reading through a grammar explanation of indirect questions and reviewing examples. Students then use the information to change direct questions into indirect questions using polite expressions. When the students have finished, the answers are checked with the class. After that, students rewrite indirect questions in the correct word order. The students then practice asking and answering the questions with a partner.
 

I was wondering...

ESL Indirect Questions Activity - Reading, Listening and Speaking - Pre-intermediate - 25 minutes

In this engaging teaching activity, students use indirect question phrases to make polite requests. Each student is given a card containing a situation and request prompt. Students read the card and then move around the class, trying to persuade as many people as possible to do whatever is on their card. Students do this by explaining the situation and using indirect question phrases to make polite requests. Students only agree to do what other people ask if they genuinely think they wouldn't mind doing it. For example, a student should only agree to take someone to the airport at 6 a.m. if they have a car and like waking up early. If a student doesn't want to do something, they decline the request and explain why. Students note down the names of the classmates who agree to their request on the back of the card. Afterwards, students give feedback to the class on how many people agreed to their request.
 

Super Polite

ESL Indirect Questions Role-Play - Reading, Listening and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 30 minutes

In this entertaining teaching activity, students role-play two situations where someone politely asks for information using indirect questions. The students are divided into pairs (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding role card. The students read their role card for the first situation (At the ticket office). Student A plays the role of a ticket agent and Student B is a customer. Student B's task is to politely ask for information about a flight to London using indirect questions. The students then role-play the situation with their partner. When the students have finished, some pairs act out their role-play in front of the class and feedback is given. Afterwards, the pairs move on to the second role-play. In the second role-play (At the hotel), Student A takes on the role of a hotel guest and Student B takes on the role of a hotel receptionist. Student A's task is to use indirect questions to politely ask for hotel information. When everyone has finished, some pairs present their role-play to the class as before.
 

Would you mind answering a few questions?

ESL Indirect Questions Role-Play - Writing, Listening and Speaking Activity - Intermediate - 35 minutes

In this intriguing role-play activity, students ask and answer indirect questions in a street interview. The students are told to imagine that they are reporters for a local radio or TV station and that they are going to interview people on the street to find out public opinion on a chosen topic. The class brainstorms possible interview topics and the students' ideas are written on the board, e.g. cryptocurrency. Each student is then given a copy of the worksheet. Students choose a topic from the board and complete five indirect questions on the worksheet based on their chosen topic, e.g. 'Could you tell me how you feel about cryptocurrency?' The students are then divided into two even groups - reporters and passers-by. The passers-by walk around the class as if they are walking along the street. The reporters stop the passers-by and ask them if they would mind answering a few questions. The reporter then writes the person's name at the top of the column and interviews them, noting down their answers on the worksheet. When all the reporters have spoken to three people, the students swap roles. When the students have finished, they report back to the class on the answers they received. With a little more preparation, this activity could be done outside with real people.
 
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