Saturday, 27 May 2017

ESL Brainstorming Games

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Alphabet Brainstorm

Age/Level: Any     Time: 20 minutes     Players: Small teams     Preparation: None

Aim: To brainstorm categories of words

Here is an excellent ESL brainstorming game for revising vocabulary or introducing a new lexical set.

Procedure

On the board, write three numbered categories, e.g. 1. clothes, 2. drinks, 3. verbs, etc. The categories you choose will depend on the vocabulary you wish to teach or revise.

Next to the categories write the letters of the alphabet with a random number next to each letter, e.g. A - 2, B - 4, C - 1, etc.

Divide the students into teams.

Give each team a piece of paper and tell them to write the letters of the alphabet in a list.

Call out a category from the board.

The teams then race to complete their list with an example for each letter.

Set a time limit for the teams.

When time is up, have the teams swap papers for marking.

For each correct word, teams score the number assigned to the letter.

Tally up the scores and then start a new round.

The team with the highest score at the end of the game wins.

Alphabet Brainstorm.PDF

 

Brainstormers

Age/Level: Any     Time: 20 minutes     Players: Teams of 3 to 4     Preparation: Write different categories to brainstorm on slips of paper

Aim: Students work together to brainstorm words in a category

Here is a fun brainstorming game to get your students working together and using English.

Before class, write categories down on slips of paper, e.g. seven things you do before you go to bed.

Procedure

Place a category slip on the teacher's desk.

Split the students into teams of three or four.

Each team chooses one student to be the runner.

The runners go to the teacher’s desk and read the category, e.g. seven things you do before you go to bed.

The runners go back to their teams and tell their team members the category.

The teams then brainstorm words in the category and write them down.

The first team to finish shouts Stop!

The winning team calls out their answers. If their answers are correct, they win one point for each word in the category.

The next category slip is placed on the table and the game begins again, and so on.

The team with the highest number of points at the end is the winner.

Brainstormers.PDF

 

Brainstorming Race

Age/Level: Any     Time: 20 minutes     Players: 2 to 4 teams     Preparation: None

Aim: To brainstorm categories of words

This ESL game is great for brainstorming new vocabulary or revising words.

Procedure

Draw two to four columns on the board and separate the students into a corresponding number of teams.

Have each team line up in front of a column and give each team a marker or chalk.

Call out a category for the students to brainstorm.

Set a time limit and let the students start writing all the words they can think of belonging to that category.

The first student in each team runs to the board, writes a word, gives the marker/chalk to the next student, and goes to the back of the line. Then the second student runs to the board and so on.

When the time limit has been reached, check the words and spelling.

The team with the highest number of correct answers wins.

To stop teams copying each other you can cross out all the words that are duplicated across the teams.

Brainstorming Race.PDF

Five Things That...

Age/Level: Elementary and above     Time: 20 minutes     Players: Small teams     Preparation: Make a list of categories with five words per category

Preparation: Write a list of categories with five words in each category

Aim: To write down five answers that match the teacher’s answers

This is a fun brainstorming game to play at the start of class. The aim is for the teams to write down five answers that match the five things on your list.

Before the game, prepare a list of categories with five words in each category

Procedure

Split the students into small teams and give each team a sheet of paper.

Call out one of the categories, e.g. five things that are watched.

The students then brainstorm and write down five answers.

Each team gets one point for each answer that matches the teacher's answer.

Play several rounds.

The team with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.

Here are some examples of categories you can use: Five things that are watched, round, listened to, made of plastic, read, used in an office, useful, blue, etc.

Five Things That.PDF

 

Outburst - Categories Game

Age/Level: Beginner     Time: 20 minutes     Players: Teams of 4 to 5     Preparation: Make a list of at least ten categories with ten words per category.

Aim: To say the words that match what's on the teacher’s list

This entertaining ESL brainstorming game is useful for brainstorming categories of words.

Before the game, prepare a list of ten categories with ten words in each category (An example is in the PDF).

Procedure

Split the class into teams of four or five.

Each team plays in turn.

Give the first team a category, e.g. verbs.

The first team then has one minute to shout out as many verbs as they can. They score a point for every word that is on your pre-written word list.

The game can be played over several rounds.

The team with the most points at the end is the winner.

Outburst.PDF

 

The Invention Game

Age/Level: Pre-intermediate and above     Time: 15 minutes     Players: Teams     Preparation: A list of everyday objects, e.g. a hammer, a mirror, a paper bag, an empty bottle, etc.

Aim: To brainstorm possible uses of objects using ‘can’ and ‘could’

This enjoyable brainstorming game encourages students to give inventive answers.

Procedure

Divide the students into teams.

Tell the students that they are going to play a game where they brainstorm possible uses for everyday objects.

Explain that each time a team calls out an inventive or believable use for an object, they win a point for their team. This game works best if you encourage fun and creative answers.

If need be, write some language on the board to help the students answer.

Examples:

You can/could ... with it.

You can/could use it as/to...

Make sure that when students call out their answers, they make a sentence.

Write one of the objects from your list on the board, e.g. a hammer.

Ask the students how they could use the object.

Each time a team calls out a suitable answer, award them one point.

Example:

Teacher: How can you use a hammer?

Team 2: You can hit nails with it.

Teacher: Yes, one point. What else can you do with a hammer?

Team 4: You could measure things with it.

Teacher: Very good. One point. Anything else?

Team 1: You can use it as a weapon.

Teacher: Yes, you can. One point. What else?

Team 3: You could scratch your back with it.

When ideas for an object begin to run out, move on to the next object.

The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

The Invention Game.PDF

Comments  

#1 Rediensch 2016-05-01 16:01
Thanks a lot for all the teaching materials you display for everybody.

The best for you!
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