ESL Drawing Games

Beetle Drive

Age/Level: Young learners     Time: 15 minutes     Players: Equal teams of 3 or 4    Preparation: Dice, paper and pencils

Aim: To draw parts of the body.

Introduction: Here is a fun drawing game for teaching parts of the body.

Procedure

Divide the students into equal teams of three or four and give each team a dice. Also, give each student a piece of paper and a pencil.

Write the following on the board:

1 = body     2 = head     3 = eyes     4 = legs     5 = antennae     6 = wings

Tell the students that they are going to each draw a picture of a beetle by rolling a dice and then drawing the part of the beetle associated with the number rolled. The aim of the game is to be the first team to complete a drawing of a beetle.

The catch is that the body must be drawn first, so students can't start drawing until they roll a one. Students must also draw a head (two) before they can draw the eyes and antennae.

The first student in each team rolls their dice. If they roll a number one, the student draws a beetle's body. The next student then rolls the dice. Again, the student must roll a number one to be able to start drawing on their paper.

This continues until one of the students in the team has completed their drawing. The first team to have one of their students complete the drawing wins the game.

You can make the game easier by giving each team a piece of paper and having them complete the drawing as a group.

You can also make the game harder by giving each team two dice and having the students draw a different animal or a human. In this version of the game, the students would draw more parts of the body and the numbers would go from 2 to 12.

Beetle Drive.PDF

 

Don't say a word!

Age/Level: Any     Time: 20 minutes     Players: Groups of 3 to 4     Preparation: Write 12 words or sentences you want the students to revise on the cards and number the cards from 1 to 12.

Aim: To draw and guess words or sentences.

Introduction: This is a good drawing game for revising vocabulary or sentence structures.

Procedure

Divide the class into groups of three or four and give each group some sheets of paper. Next, give each group the first card by placing it face down on the group's table.

Explain that when you say 'go', one student in the group picks up the card and has 60 seconds to draw the word or sentence for the other students to guess. The student drawing is not allowed to speak or write anything.

While the student is drawing, the other members of the group try to guess the word or sentence. The students must say exactly what is on the card to win.

When the time limit has been reached, shout 'stop'. Ask each group if they were able to guess the word or sentence. Award one point to each group that guessed correctly.

The second card is then placed face down on each group's table and it's the next student's turn to draw.

The game continues until all the cards have been used. The team with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.

Don't say a word.PDF

  

Draw the Sentence

Age/Level: Elementary     Time: 25 minutes     Players: 2 teams     Preparation: None

Aim: To guess what people are doing in a picture using the present continuous tense.

Introduction: Here is an imaginative ESL drawing game for practicing the present continuous tense.

Procedure

Ask the students to write down three present continuous sentences, starting with: He, She and They. Tell the students not to show or tell anyone their sentences.

Next, divide the students into two teams (A and B). One student from Team A comes up to the board with their three sentences.

Team A then has one minute to guess as many of the student's sentences as possible. The student begins drawing one of their sentences on the board. The student is not allowed to speak or write anything.

If Team A guess the sentence before one minute is up, the student draws their next sentence for Team A to guess. Team A scores one point for each sentence they guess correctly within the one-minute time frame.

A student from Team B then comes up to the board and so on. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Draw the Sentence.PDF

 

Pictionary

Age/Level: Any     Time: 20 minutes     Players: 2 teams     Preparation: Two plastic hammers or pictures of the target vocabulary

Aim: To guess words from drawings.

Introduction: This ESL drawing game is ideal for revising vocabulary. There are two versions of this game, one is for young learners and the other is for older students.

Procedure

This version of the game is suitable for young learners.

Divide the students into two teams and have each team sit in a circle. Put a plastic hammer in the centre of each circle.

Draw a picture on the board. If a student knows what the picture is, they hit the floor with the plastic hammer and call out the answer. The first team to answer correctly scores one point.

Play until all the vocabulary has been reviewed. The team with the most points wins the game.

For older students, you can use this version of the game.

Put the students into two teams. A student from each team comes up to the board. Show the two students a picture of the target vocabulary.

Each student then draws the picture on the board. The two students are not allowed to speak or write anything. 

The first team to guess the word scores a point. Then, two new students come up to the board and so on.

Play until all the vocabulary has been reviewed. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Pictionary.PDF

 

Quick Draw

Age/Level: Any     Time: 15 minutes     Players: Teams of 4 or 5     Preparation: Write vocabulary you want the students to revise on small cards.

Aim: To identify and guess words from a drawing

Introduction: You can use this drawing game to help students revise vocabulary you have been teaching in class.

Procedure

Divide the students into teams of four or five. Invite a student from one team to come up to the board and take a word card.

The student then has 15 seconds to draw the word on the card. The student is not allowed to speak or write anything.

The student's team then has three chances to guess the word. If the team guesses correctly on their first try, they score three points. If they guess correctly on their second attempt, they get two points. On their last try, they score one point.

The team must say exactly what's written on the card to win.

If the team fails to guess the word, the other teams race to answer. The other teams are allowed one guess each. If another team manages to guess the word, they are awarded one point.

Then, a student from the next team comes up to the board and takes a word card and so on. The team with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.

Quick Draw.PDF

 

The Drawing Game

Age/Level: Elementary and above     Time: 20 minutes     Players: 2 teams     Preparation: None

Aim: To guess the names of famous films, TV shows, books or people from drawings.

Introduction: Here is a fun drawing game to help motivate your students to speak English.

Procedure

Divide the students into two teams.

Take one student from each team out of the classroom. Tell the two students the name of a famous film, TV show, book or person and then give each student a marker or chalk.

The two students then go back into the classroom and start drawing clues to the famous film, TV show, book or person on the board. The two students are not allowed to speak or write anything.

The first team to correctly guess what's being drawn scores a point. Then, two new students are taken out of the classroom and so on.

The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

The Drawing Game.PDF

 

The Picture Game

Age/Level: Any     Time: 15 minutes     Players: Pairs     Preparation: Make one copy of two pictures for each pair of students.

Aim: To describe a picture for a partner to draw.

Introduction: In this drawing activity, students play a game where they have to accurately describe a picture for a partner to draw.

Procedure

Before you begin the game, review prepositions of place and any vocabulary related to the two pictures with the class.

Next, divide the students into pairs. One student is the 'speaker' and the other is the 'drawer'. The drawer sits facing away from the speaker.

Give each speaker a copy of the chosen picture and give each drawer a piece of paper.

Set a time limit, depending on the kind of picture the students are drawing. The speaker then describes the picture to the drawer.

The drawer cannot look at the picture, but they can use English to ask questions to help them draw a more accurate picture.

When the time limit has been reached, ask the students to stop drawing. The drawers then show their pictures to the class. The student with the most accurate picture wins the game.

Afterwards, have the students swap roles and repeat the game with the other picture.

The Picture Game.PDF

 

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