Present Perfect - Ever (Experience) ESL Activities, Games and Worksheets

Find someone who...

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Writing and Speaking - Elementary - 30 minutes

This engaging present perfect activity helps to teach students how to construct 'Have you ever...?' questions to ask about experiences. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. Students use the prompts in the chart on their worksheet to ask 'Have you ever...?' questions to their classmates. When a classmate answers 'Yes, I have', the student writes their name in the 'Name' column next to the prompt. The student then asks follow-up questions to obtain more information. When everyone has finished, students tell the class what they found out by making present perfect statements.
 

Find someone who has...

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Writing and Speaking - Elementary - 30 minutes

In this 'Have you ever...?' worksheet activity, students ask and answer present perfect questions to find out about other students' experiences. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. Students use the prompts in the chart on their worksheet to ask 'Have you ever...?' questions to their classmates, e.g. 'Have you ever been on TV?' When a classmate answers 'Yes, I have', the student writes that person's name in the 'Name' column next to the item and asks follow-up questions to obtain more information. When everyone has finished, students give feedback to the rest of the class on what they found out by making present perfect statements with 'has'.
 

Have you ever...?

ESL Present Perfect Game - Writing and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 45 minutes

In this amusing 'Have you ever...?' activity, students create present perfect questions and then play a true or false game using the questions along with the past simple to ask for and give more information. Each group of four is divided into two teams (Team A and B). Each team is given a set of verb cards. The teams write a present perfect 'Have you ever...?' question for each verb. The game then begins with a player from Team A picking up one of Team B’s verb cards. Team B then asks the player the 'Have you ever…?' question that corresponds with the verb. The player from Team A answers 'Yes, I have', regardless of whether it’s true or not. Team B then asks three past simple follow-up questions. After the three questions have been asked, Team B decides if the player’s answer is true or false. The player then reveals the truth. If Team B guesses correctly, they win a point. A player from Team B then picks up one of Team A’s verb cards and so on. The game continues until all the cards have been used. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.
 

Have You Ever Bingo

ESL Present Perfect Game - Listening and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 30 minutes

In this entertaining 'Have you ever...?' game, students have to find classmates who have had the experiences shown on their bingo card. Each student is given a bingo card containing nine experiences. The students then play a game of bingo by changing each verb on their bingo card into its past participle form and creating a present perfect question with 'ever' from the prompt, e.g. if the prompt was 'lose some money', the student would say 'Have you ever lost some money?' When a classmate answers 'Yes, I have', the student writes down their name under the prompt on their bingo card. The first student to get three names in a row shouts 'Bingo!' This student wins the first round. Students then continue the game to see who can complete all nine squares with names. The first student to do this wins the second round. Students play several rounds using a different bingo card each time.
 

Have You Ever Survey

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing and Speaking - Elementary - 30 minutes

In this enjoyable present perfect activity, students practice talking about their experiences by asking and answering 'Have you ever...?' questions and using the past simple to ask for and give more information. Each student is given a card containing three questions. The students go around asking everyone in their class or group the 'Have you ever...?' question on their card. Whenever a classmate answers 'Yes, I have', students ask the past simple follow-up questions on the card and note down the answers. At the end of the activity, students report back their findings to the class.
 

Deception

ESL Present Perfect Game - Writing and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 45 minutes

This fun game helps to teach students how to use the present perfect to talk about experiences. Students begin by writing down twelve present perfect sentences about things that they 'have' and 'haven't done' in their lives using the verbs in the box on the worksheet. Six of the sentences should be true and six should be false. When the students have finished writing, they cut out true and false cards at the bottom of their worksheet. Next, the class is split into teams. Each team plays against another team. One student goes first and reads one of his or her sentences to the opposing team. The opposing team's players each put down a true or false card depending on whether they think the statement is true or not. The student then reveals the answer. The opposing team gets one point for each correct guess. Then one student on the other team reads one of their sentences and so on. The game continues back and forth with one team reading a sentence and the other team guessing whether it is true or false, until all the sentences have been used. The team with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.
 

I have never...

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing and Speaking - Pre-intermediate - 35 minutes

In this intriguing present perfect worksheet, students write about things they have and haven't experienced. The students then discuss their answers with a partner. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. Working alone, students complete the sentences on their worksheet with true information about things they have and haven't experienced, e.g. 'I have never tried Indonesian food, but I have tried Vietnamese food'. When the students have completed the sentences, they are divided into pairs. Students then take it in turns to read each sentence to their partner. After a student has read a sentence, their partner asks the student follow-up questions to find out as much information as possible. This continues until all the sentences have been read and discussed. Afterwards, students share what they found out about their partner. Any interesting or surprising information is then discussed in more detail.
 

Just Say Yes

ESL Present Perfect Game - Reading and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 35 minutes

In this amusing 'Have you ever...?' game, students use the present perfect to talk about experiences at an unspecified time in the past. Students then use the past simple to find out more details. Each group of three is given a set of question cards. The students take it in turns to interview the other people in their group. Their task is to find out who is lying and who is telling the truth. One student begins by taking the top card from the pile. This student asks the other two students the question on the card using the present perfect with 'ever', e.g. 'Have you ever won a competition?' The other students answer 'Yes, I have', even if it’s not true. The interviewer then asks the two students three past simple follow-up questions from the prompts on the card, e.g. 'What competition did you enter?' The interviewer then tries to work out if the students are lying or telling the truth, scoring one point for each correct guess. The next student then picks up a card and takes on the role of the interviewer and so on. The student with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.
 

Life Experiences

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Writing and Speaking - Pre-intermediate - 35 minutes

In this memorable present perfect activity, students ask and answer questions about life experiences using ‘been’. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. The worksheet contains 15 ‘Have you been...?’ questions about life experiences. Working alone, students write one follow-up question for each item on their worksheet. After that, the class is divided into groups of five or six. The students then find out who answers 'yes' to the ‘Have you been...?’ questions on the worksheet. One student asks the first question to the group, e.g. 'Have you been camping?' All the students write down the names of anyone who answers 'Yes, I’ve been camping'. Each student in turn then asks their follow-up question to find out as much information as possible. Another student then asks the second question and so on. This process continues until all the questions have been asked and discussed. When everyone has finished, each group reports their findings to the class using the present perfect with ‘been’, e.g. 'We’ve all been camping. Most of us have been camping in a field, but Amelia has been camping on top of a mountain', etc.
 

Present Perfect Speculation

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Writing and Speaking - Intermediate - 40 minutes

In this 'Have you ever...?' activity, students ask and answer questions to find out who has experienced certain things. The class is divided into groups and each student is given a copy of the worksheet. Working alone, students try to guess how many people in their group have had the various experiences written on their worksheet. Students then take it in turns to ask their group members 'Have you ever...?' questions in order to find out the exact number of people who have had each experience, e.g. 'Have you ever stayed up all night?' Based on the number of people who have had each experience, students complete each statement on their worksheet with one of the listed phrases, e.g. All of us, Some of us, etc. Finally, there is a class feedback session where groups read out their findings to the class.
 

What have you done?

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing and Speaking - Pre-intermediate - 40 minutes

In this present perfect worksheet activity, students write true and false sentences about what they 'have' and 'haven't done' in their lives. The students then play a guessing game where a partner tries to work out which sentences are true and false by asking past simple follow-up questions. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. The students complete 20 present perfect sentences on the worksheet, making half the sentences true and half false. When they have finished, the students are divided into pairs. One student goes first and reads the first sentence to their partner. Their partner asks past simple follow-up questions to find out if the sentence is true or false. After a few questions have been answered, their partner makes a guess and the answer is revealed. Students score one point for each correct guess. When all the sentences have been read, the students swap roles. The student with the most points at the end of the game is the winner. Afterwards, the students are put into small groups. The students look at the sentences about experiences they haven’t had, and say which things they want to do and which they don’t want to do, giving reasons why or why not.
 

It's my Life

ESL Present Perfect Activity - Reading, Writing and Speaking - Intermediate - 35 minutes

In this present perfect activity, students practice talking about their life experiences. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. Students answer twelve questions on their worksheet by writing short answers in a random order in the boxes at the bottom of the sheet. When the students have finished writing, the class is divided into pairs. The students swap worksheets and look at the short answers their partner has written. They then practice talking about their life experiences using the present perfect tense. To do this, students take it in turns to ask their partner why they have written the words in the boxes, e.g. 'Why have you written the word ‘charity’?' Their partner replies using the present perfect, e.g. 'I’ve spent a lot of time raising money for charity. It's something I’m very proud of'. The other student then asks their partner follow-up questions, e.g. 'What charity have you raised money for?' When everyone has finished, the students report back to the class on the most interesting or surprising things they found out about their partner.
 
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