Comparatives ESL Games, Activities and Worksheets

Comparative Cards

ESL Comparatives Game - Grammar: Forming Sentences - Pair Work - Elementary (A1-A2) - 35 minutes

In this free comparatives card game, students link nouns together by making comparative sentences with than. One student goes first and puts one of their noun cards face-up on the table. Students then take it in turns to put down a noun card and make a comparative sentence with than, linking the two nouns together, e.g. 'A car is faster than a bus'. 'A bus is bigger than an elephant', etc. Students can put a card down either before or after the card or card chain on the table, similar to dominoes. Each time a student puts down a card they must use a different comparative adjective. If a student makes a grammar mistake or can't think of a way to link two noun cards together, they miss a turn. The first student to get rid of all their cards wins the game. Finally, pairs write out the comparative sentences they made and then read them out to the class.
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Fun Facts

ESL Comparative Adjectives Game - Grammar: Gap-fill, Guessing - Pair Work - Elementary (A1-A2) - 20 minutes

Here is a fun comparative adjectives guessing game for elementary students to play in class. In the game, students guess missing comparative adjectives in sentences about fun facts. Both students have the same sentences, but where they have a comparative adjective in bold, their partner has a gap and vice versa. Student B starts by reading the first sentence and guessing the missing comparative adjective. Student B has three chances to guess the comparative adjective. If Student B’s comparative adjective is the same as what Student A has in bold on their worksheet, Student B scores three points and writes the comparative adjective in the gap. If the guess is wrong, Student B tries again for two points and then for one point. Then, it's Student A's turn to guess the missing comparative adjective in the second sentence and so on. The student with the most points at the end of the game wins.
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Introduction to Comparatives

ESL Comparative Adjectives Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Categorizing, Gap-fill, Unscrambling, Multiple Choice - Elementary (A1-A2) - 30 minutes

This comparatives worksheet helps students learn and practice comparative adjectives and comparative sentences with than. Students begin by categorizing adjectives and writing them in their comparative form. Next, students complete sentences with the comparative form of adjectives + than. Students then move on to rearrange words to form comparative sentences. Lastly, students do a multiple-choice exercise where they choose the correct answer and complete comparative sentences.
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Think of a Word

ESL Comparatives Game - Vocabulary: Word Association - Group Work - Elementary (A1-A2) - 20 minutes

Here is a free comparatives game to play in class. Write a noun on the board, e.g. piano. Teams then race to write down something bigger and smaller than the noun, a verb that goes with the noun, a word that comes earlier in the dictionary, a longer and a shorter word beginning with the same letter as the noun, an adjective to describe the noun, and the opposite of that adjective. When a team has completed all the items, check their answers. If the answers are appropriate, the team scores a point. The game continues with a different noun being used each round. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.
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Comparative Clues

ESL Comparatives Game - Grammar: Forming Sentences from Prompts, Guessing - Pair Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

Here is an engaging comparatives guessing game for students to play in class. In the game, students give comparative clues to a partner who tries to guess who or what is being described. The aim of the game is to help their partner guess the words in bold on their worksheet by giving three clues to them using comparative forms. Students take it in turns to give three comparative clues to their partner. When students are giving clues, they substitute pronouns for the words in bold they are describing, e.g. 'It's more useful than a radio'. Students score one point for each correct guess. The student in each pair with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.
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Fill in the Blank

ESL Comparative Adjectives Game - Grammar and Vocabulary: Forming Sentences from Prompts, Gap-fill, Guessing - Group Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 35 minutes

In this entertaining guessing game, students race to guess missing comparative adjectives in sentences. Students take it in turns to pick up a card and make a sentence using the comparative form of the adjective on the card, but instead of saying the comparative adjective, the student uses the word 'blank', e.g. 'Cars are 'blank' than bicycles'. The other group members then race to guess the missing comparative adjective. The first student to guess correctly wins and keeps the card. The student with the most cards at the end of the game is the winner.
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Run Faster

ESL Comparatives Activity - Speaking: Running Dictation - Grammar Game: Writing Sentences from Prompts, True or False, Guessing - Pair Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 30 minutes

In this comparatives running dictation activity, students dictate sentences and then use them to make true or false comparative facts which they use in a guessing game. Student A is the writer and Student B is the reader. The reader runs to 'Set A' sentences on the wall outside the classroom, reads the first sentence, runs back and dictates it to their partner who writes it down. This continues until all ten sentences have been fully dictated. Students then swap roles for 'Set B' sentences and the process is repeated. Working alone, students use the ten sentences to create true or false comparative sentences using adjectives. Finally, students play a true or false game where they read the comparative facts to their partner who guesses if they are true or false. The student with the most correct guesses wins.
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The Comparison Game

ESL Comparisons Game - Grammar and Speaking: Forming Sentences from Prompts - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 20 minutes

This fast-paced comparison game is perfect for practicing comparative sentence structure. A student from each team comes to the front of the class. Give the two students two things to compare, e.g. a car and a bus. One student starts and makes a comparative sentence about the two things, e.g. 'A car is faster than a bus'. Then, the other student makes a comparative sentence using a different comparative adjective, e.g. 'A bus is bigger than a car'. This continues back and forth until one student makes a grammar mistake, repeats a comparative adjective, can't think of anything to say or is too slow to answer. The winning student scores a point for their team. Then, a new pair comes up to the front of the class and so on. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.
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Which bicycle?

ESL Comparatives Activity - Reading, Grammar and Vocabulary Exercises: Scanning, Unscrambling, Sentence Completion - Speaking Activity: Information Gap, Freer Practice - Pair Work - Pre-intermediate (A2) - 40 minutes

Here is a comparatives information gap activity for students to do in class. In the activity, students compare information about bicycles using comparatives. In two groups, students read the paragraph on the worksheet and then fill in a chart with bicycle information from the text. Next, students pair up with someone from the other group. Students ask their partner about the other people's bikes and complete the chart with the information. Students then use the bike information to make comparative sentences, comparing the bikes. Next, students unscramble comparative sentences using the bicycle information to help them. Finally, students write true sentences to compare the bicycles using the comparative forms of the adjectives on the worksheet.
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As ... As Expressions

ESL As ... As Expressions Activity - Grammar Exercise: Gap-fill - Speaking Activity: Guided Discussion, Role-Play, Freer Practice - Pair Work - Intermediate (B1) - 45 minutes

In this comparative expressions activity, students learn common comparative expressions with as ... as. First, students complete 12 comparative as ... as expressions on their worksheet with word pairs. Next, in pairs, students discuss in what situations they might use expressions 1 to 6, and what they think 'it' refers to in expressions 7 to 12. Students write their ideas under the expressions on the worksheet. When everyone has finished, there is a class feedback session to run through the students' ideas and answers. Afterwards, each pair creates a dialogue using four of the comparative expressions from the worksheet and presents it to the class.
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Comparatives Board Game

ESL Comparatives Board Game - Grammar and Speaking: Changing Word Forms, Asking and Answering Questions from Prompts, Freer Practice - Pair Work - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes

In this comparatives board game, students change adjectives into their comparative forms and then use the comparative adjectives to ask and answer conversation questions. Students take it in turns to roll the dice and move their counter along the board. When a student lands on a square, they change the adjective in the conversation question into its comparative form and then ask the question to their partner. Their partner then answers the question in sentence form, explaining any reasons in more detail. The two students continue taking it in turns to ask and answer the comparative conversation questions until one student reaches the finish. That student wins the game.
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Comparatives Practice

ESL Comparatives Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Gap-fill, Binary Choice, Rewriting Sentences - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes

Here is a comparatives worksheet to help students practice comparative adjectives and the as + adjective + as comparative structure. Students begin with a gap-fill exercise where they complete sentences with the comparative form of the adjectives in brackets. Next, students choose the correct answers in a set of comparative sentences. Students then move on to practice the as + adjective + as comparative structure by writing negative comparative sentences that have the same meaning as the sentences shown. Afterwards, students write positive or negative comparative sentences with as + adjective + as, giving their opinion.
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Comparatives Survey

ESL Comparatives Activity - Grammar, Speaking and Writing: Gap-fill, Asking and Answering Questions from Prompts, Summary Writing, Controlled and Freer Practice - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes

In this free comparatives activity, students conduct a class survey where they ask and answer questions using comparative adjectives. Students begin by completing a question on a card with the comparative form of the adjective in brackets. Students then go around the class asking the question on their card and recording their classmates' answers on the back, e.g. 'Which country do you think is bigger, Canada or the United States?' Students must answer each question in sentence form, e.g. 'I think that Canada is bigger than the United States'. When the students have spoken to everyone in the class, they write a short summary of their survey results and report back to the class on their findings.
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Which is better?

ESL Comparatives Activity - Speaking: Asking and Answering Questions, Guided Discussion, Freer Practice - Group Work - Intermediate (B1) - 30 minutes

Here is a comparatives speaking activity for students to do in class. In the activity, students use comparatives to say which of two things they think is better and why. Students take it in turns to pick up a card and ask the other students in the group a Which is better, ... or ...? Why? question from the prompt on the card, e.g. 'Which is better, waking up early or waking up late? Why?' Each student then answers the question using comparative forms. After each student has given their answer, students discuss the topic before moving on to the next card. If a student picks up an 'or' card, they can ask any 'Which is better...?' question they like. When the students have finished, they give feedback to the class on which things they think are better and why.
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A lot, Much and Slightly

ESL Comparisons Game - Grammar and Speaking: Matching, Sentence Completion, Freer Practice - Group Work - Upper-intermediate (B2) - 25 minutes

In this making comparisons game, students match sentence halves together and connect them with the modifiers a lot, much or slightly and suitable comparative adjectives. In groups, players take it in turns to pick up a sentence beginning card, read it aloud and place it face-up on the desk. All the players then check their cards to see if they have a matching ending. If they do, they read it out, connecting the sentence using the modifier provided and a comparative adjective which they think is suitable. If the other players agree that the ending matches and that the comparative adjective is appropriate, the two cards are removed from the game. If a matching card is played but players believe it has been read out incorrectly or that the comparative adjective is unsuitable, the player takes back their card and the beginning card is put at the bottom of the pile. If the other players think the ending does not match, the player takes back their card and the game continues. The first player to get rid of all their cards wins the game.
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Comparative Communication

ESL Comparatives Game - Vocabulary: Gap-fill, Guessing - Pair Work - Upper-intermediate (B2) - 30 minutes

Here is a comparative adjectives guessing game for Business English students or adults to play in class on the topic of communication. Both students have the same sentences on their worksheet, but where one student has a comparative adjective in bold, their partner has a gap and vice versa. Student B starts by reading the first sentence to their partner and guessing the missing comparative adjective. If Student B’s guess is the same as what Student A has in bold on their worksheet, Student B scores three points and writes the comparative adjective in the gap. If the guess is wrong, Student B tries again for two points and then for one point. Then, it's Student A's turn to guess the missing comparative adjective in the second sentence and so on. The student with the highest number of points at the end of the game is the winner. In pairs, students then discuss whether they agree or disagree with each sentence.
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Comparative Correlative: The ... the

ESL Comparative Correlative Worksheet - Grammar Exercises: Matching, Rewriting Sentence, Writing Short Answers - Speaking Game: Forming Sentences - Pair Work - Upper-intermediate (B2) - 25 minutes

This correlative comparisons worksheet helps students practice comparative correlative constructions. Students start by matching comparative correlative clauses together. Next, students rewrite conditional sentences using comparative correlative constructions. After that, students answer questions using short comparative correlative constructions with 'the better' to show their preference. Lastly, in pairs, students take it in turns to choose a topic and make The ... the constructions about the topic until one of them fails to make a correlative comparison. The winning student scores a point. The student with the most points wins the game.
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Three Reasons

ESL Comparatives Game - Grammar and Speaking: Matching, Forming Sentences from Prompts, Freer Practice - Group Work - Upper-intermediate (B2) - 30 minutes

In this making comparisons game, students make complex comparisons between verb and noun phrases in order to express an opinion. The first player tries to make a sentence by placing one of their dominoes at either end of the domino on the table, matching the beginning half of a sentence with an ending or vice versa. If the player matches two sentence halves correctly, they make a comparative sentence with as ... as or more/less ... than that best expresses their own opinion, e.g. 'Learning in a classroom is not as difficult as learning online'. The player then has 30 seconds to give three reasons to back up their opinion. If they are successful, the domino remains in place and it's the next students turn to play. If the player cannot do this, or makes a grammatically incorrect sentence, they take back their domino and play passes to the next student. The first player to get rid of all their dominoes wins the game.
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