Saturday, 23 September 2017

Comparative Adjectives and Forms - ESL EFL Games, Activities and Worksheets

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Comparative Cards

ESL EFL Matching, Speaking and Writing Activity - Elementary - 35 Minutes

In this engaging pairwork activity, students play a card game where they link nouns together by making comparative sentences with 'than'. The class is divided into pairs. Each pair of students is given a set of noun cards, which they shuffle and deal out evenly. One student goes first and puts one of their noun cards face up on the table. The students then take it in turns to put down a noun card and make a comparative sentence with 'than', linking the two nouns together, e.g. 'A car is faster than a bus'. 'A bus is bigger than an elephant', etc. Students can put a card down either before or after the card or card chain on the table, similar to dominoes. Each time a student puts down a card they must use a different comparative adjective. If a student makes a grammar mistake or can't think of a way to link two noun cards together, they miss a turn. This continues back and forth with students linking nouns together with different comparative adjectives. The first student to get rid of all their cards wins the game. When the students have finished, pairs write out the comparative sentences they made. Students then read out their sentences to the class and feedback is given.

Comparative Cards.PDF  Free 

 

Fun Facts

ESL EFL Reading, Writing and Speaking Activity - Elementary - 20 Minutes

Here is a fun guessing game for students who are learning comparative adjectives. In the activity, students guess missing comparative adjectives in sentences about fun facts. The class is divided into pairs (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding part of the worksheet. Both students have the same sentences, but where they have a comparative adjective in bold, their partner has a gap and vice versa. Student B starts by reading the first sentence and guessing the missing comparative adjective. Student B has three chances to guess the comparative adjective. If Student B’s comparative adjective is the same as what Student A has in bold on their worksheet, Student B scores three points and writes the comparative adjective in the gap. If the guess is wrong, Student B tries again for two points and then for one point. Then, it's Student A's turn to guess the missing comparative adjective in the second sentence and so on. This continues until all the sentences have been guessed. The student with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Fun Facts.PDF  Free 

 

Comparative Clues

ESL EFL Listening and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 30 Minutes

In this fun guessing game, students give comparative clues to a partner who tries to guess who or what is being described. The class is divided into pairs (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding worksheet. The aim of the game is to help their partner guess the words in bold on their worksheet by giving three clues to them using comparative forms. Before the students begin, they complete three empty boxes at the bottom of the worksheet with their own words and comparative clues. Students then take it in turns to give three comparative clues to their partner. When students are giving clues, they substitute pronouns for the words in bold they are describing, e.g. 'It's more useful than a radio'. Students score one point for each correct guess. The student in each pair with the most points at the end of the game is the winner. When everyone has finished, students read the clues they created themselves to the class. The class then tries to guess who or what is being described.

Comparative Clues.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Comparative Communication

Business English - Reading, Writing and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 30 Minutes

In this worksheet activity for Business English students or adults, students guess missing comparative adjectives in sentences about communication. The students are split into pairs (A and B) and each student is given a corresponding worksheet. Both students have the same sentences on their worksheet, but where one student has a comparative adjective in bold, their partner has a gap and vice versa. Student B starts by reading the first sentence to their partner and guessing the missing comparative adjective. If Student B’s guess is the same as what Student A has in bold on their worksheet, Student B scores three points and writes the comparative adjective in the gap. If the guess is wrong, Student B tries again for two points and then for one point. Then, it's Student A's turn to guess the missing comparative adjective in the second sentence and so on. This continues back and forth until all the sentences have been guessed. The student with the highest number of points at the end of the game is the winner. In pairs, students then discuss whether they agree or disagree with each sentence. Afterwards, students give feedback to the class on their answers.

Comparative Communication.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Comparative Expressions

ESL EFL Reading, Writing and Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 45 Minutes

In this insightful worksheet activity, students learn common comparative expressions with 'as … as'. Each student is given a copy of the worksheet. The students complete 12 comparative 'as ... as' expressions on their worksheet with word pairs. When the students have finished, the answers are checked with the class. The class is then divided into pairs. The pairs discuss in what situations they might use expressions 1 to 6, and what they think 'it' refers to in expressions 7 to 12. The students write their ideas under the expressions on the worksheet. When everyone has finished, there is a class feedback session to run through the students' ideas and answers. Afterwards, each pair creates a dialogue using four of the comparative expressions from the worksheet and presents it to the class.

Comparative Expressions.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Fill in the Blank

ESL EFL Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 35 Minutes

In this engaging teaching activity, students play a card game where they race to guess missing comparative adjectives in sentences. Each group of four is given a set of adjective cards, which they shuffle and place in a pile face down on the desk. Students take it in turns to pick up a card from the pile, without showing it to anyone. The student then makes a sentence using the comparative form of the adjective on the card, but instead of saying the comparative adjective, the student uses the word 'blank', e.g. 'Cars are 'blank' than bicycles'. The other group members then race to guess the missing comparative adjective. The first student to guess correctly wins and keeps the card. Then, it's the next student's turn to pick up a card and so on. If the students are having a hard time guessing, the student with the card can make other comparative sentences using the adjective to help them guess. The student with the most cards at the end of the game is the winner.

Fill in the Blank.PDF  Exclusive 

 

Which is better?

ESL EFL Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 30 Minutes

In this group discussion activity, students use comparative forms to say which of two things they think is better and why. The class is divided into groups of three or four and each group is given a set of cards. Students take it in turns to pick up a card and ask the other students in the group a 'Which is better, ... or ...? Why?' question from the prompt on the card, e.g. 'Which is better, waking up early or waking up late? Why?' Each student then answers the question using comparative forms. After each student has given their answer, the students discuss the topic before moving on to the next card. If a student picks up an 'or' card, they can ask any 'Which is better...?' question they like. Alternatively, you can personalize the activity by writing local things to compare on these cards. When the students have finished, they give feedback to the class on which things they think are better and why.

Which is better.PDF  Exclusive 

 

The Comparison Game

ESL EFL Speaking Activity - Pre-intermediate - 20 Minutes

This fast-paced speaking game is perfect for practicing comparative adjectives and structures. The class is divided into two teams (A and B). One student from each team comes to the front of the class. The two students are given two things to compare, e.g. a car and a bus. One student starts and makes a comparative sentence about the two things, e.g. 'A car is faster than a bus'. Then, the other student makes a comparative sentence using a different comparative adjective, e.g. 'A bus is bigger than a car'. This continues back and forth until one student makes a grammar mistake, repeats a comparative adjective, can't think of anything to say or is too slow to answer. The winning student gets a point for their team. Then, a new pair comes up to the front of the class and so on. The team with the most points at the end of the game wins.

The Comparison Game.PDF  Exclusive 

 

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